Stellarium: Must Have for Teachers & Learners

We all love to look up to ponder the stars and now there is a FREE open source software to help you see a realistic sky in 3D on your computer. Stellarium is described as a “planetarium for your computer”. You can download the software free at www.stellarium.org

Some of the features include: – over 120,000 stars from the Hipparcos catalogue with info – asterisms and illustrations of the constellations – – images of nebulae – realistic Milky Way – very realistic atmosphere, sunrise and sunset – the planets and their satellites – a powerful zoom – time control – multilingual interface – scripting to record and play your own shows – fisheye projection for planetarium domes – spheric mirror projection for your own dome – graphical interface and extensive keyboard control – equatorial and azimuthal grids – star twinkling – shooting stars – eclipse simulation – skinnable landscapes, now with spheric panorama projection – add your own deep sky objects, landscapes, constellation images, scripts…

Get your FREE copy today—http://www.stellarium.org/

 

Reading, Writing, & Research in the Digital Age

Another great resource from Pew Internet

School Library Journal’s Leadership Summit 2011, Director Lee Rainie looked at the “state of reading” in the digital age by going through Pew Internet data about how teens use the internet, smartphones, and social networking sites. He argued that reading is now 1) raw material for further creation; 2) real-time in the mobile age; 3) a “social contact sport” as teens share reading and other media and learn from them.

Reading, Writing, & Research in the Digital Age

iThinkMedia: Recovering Our Content

iThinkMedia crashed several months ago and we’ve been attempting to gather the articles to recreate the years of writing and content we had on the site.

Good news we haven’t given up — bad news is we’re not making progress as quickly as we’d like so in the meantime we’ll just start writing again.

New Orleans Accents in Honor of Mardi Gras

Tonight I had a conversation with a friend who brought up the southern accent. I have dealt with this issue all my life. I was raised in Louisiana and for years I was teased about my accent when I traveled around the country. And when I entered college I made a conscious effort to loose my accent because everyone formed a opinion of me based on the way I spoke.So of course I turned to YouTube to see if I could find some information about accents, specifically southern Louisiana or Cajun accents. I was happy to find there were several videos that give a good overview of different accents in the area and I’ve included them in the post.

I hope you enjoy them – I especially love Justin Wilson who teaches you how to make chicken/sausage gumbo!